11 August 2010 ~ 0 Comments

The Passage by Justin Cronin

I really enjoy end of the world novels and movies. It’s the fight to survive, the burned out cities, the ruin. Death, destruction and devastation. Perhaps that makes me a little macabre, but whatever.

I don’t think you can talk about this book without mentioning The Stand by Stephen King. I won’t say it’s as good as The Stand (which is by far the best post-apocalyptic novel ever written), but it has that same feel. It moves slowly in places while it sets up the back story, but it moves quickly in others while it races towards it’s ending.

I won’t put any spoilers, but the ending really angered me at first. Then I read it was the first book in a triology, so the ending is a little more understandable, however I prefer my series books to be wrapped up a little tighter.

I had a few reservations reading this book. First was the sheer size, which can be overwhelming and all encompassing. The second was that there are vampires in it. I love the idea of zombies and vampires and werewolves, but I don’t really like them in my serious books. They’re fine for fun, but not for my “real” books. Don’t let this stop you though. The vampire angle is handled differently than you might expect and they are a small part of the story.

Don’t miss this one or be intimidated by it. It’s a really good read that’s broken up. Very highly recommended, a must read.

Description:
First, the unthinkable: a security breach at a secret U.S. government facility unleashes the monstrous product of a chilling military experiment. Then, the unspeakable: a night of chaos and carnage gives way to sunrise on a nation, and ultimately a world, forever altered. All that remains for the stunned survivors is the long fight ahead and a future ruled by fear—of darkness, of death, of a fate far worse.

As civilization swiftly crumbles into a primal landscape of predators and prey, two people flee in search of sanctuary. FBI agent Brad Wolgast is a good man haunted by what he’s done in the line of duty. Six-year-old orphan Amy Harper Bellafonte is a refugee from the doomed scientific project that has triggered apocalypse. He is determined to protect her from the horror set loose by her captors. But for Amy, escaping the bloody fallout is only the beginning of a much longer odyssey—spanning miles and decades—towards the time and place where she must finish what should never have begun.

With The Passage, award-winning author Justin Cronin has written both a relentlessly suspenseful adventure and an epic chronicle of human endurance in the face of unprecedented catastrophe and unimaginable danger. Its inventive storytelling, masterful prose, and depth of human insight mark it as a crucial and transcendent work of modern fiction.

Rating: ★★★★★

Book count for 2010: 55

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